The Republic of Australia

Uluru. Northern Territory founded 1911. photo pixabay.com

Uluru. Northern Territory founded 1911. photo pixabay.com

On January 1st, 1901, without war or revolution, the self-governing colonies of Great Britain became the federated states within the Commonwealth of Australia.

From the day when Captain Arthur Phillip finally landed at Sydney Cove on January 26, 1788, with the First Fleet, it was inevitable that His Majesty King George III’s  penal colony of New South Wales would one day become a nation.

It is just as inevitable that one day the nation of Australia will become a Republic, with an Australian replacing the British Monarch as Head of State.

Australians are all too aware aware that over past decades, there has been much discussion and debate about Australian Republicanism. But it is not a new discussion. Many will be surprised that this discussion dates back to the mid 1800’s, and is as old as the move to nationhood itself. And it is as contentious today as it was then.

In recent times there has been one major vexatious issue: 

Should an Australian Head of State be elected by the people of Australia or should the Head of State be appointed by the Prime Minister, the Federal Government or a “Council”, without the people having a direct say?

Both models have their supporters who have a strong and unshakable belief that their solution is the correct one.

This site will present an alternative model which will bring both groups of supporters closer together and ultimately to Australia becoming a republic.

The case put forward and called The State Election Model (SEM), would a be method unique to Australia. 8 candidates will be selected from the states and territories by the people and their elected Representatives will make the final decision on who shall be the Head of State

The SEM has been put into several sections and each section has a dedicated page where you can read and then comment:

1. Preamble – An Introduction to the State Election Model (SEM)
2. Nomination of a Candidate
3. Election of a State or Territory Representative
4. Selection of an Australian Head of State
5. Consideration - Such as dismissal, length of term, and other issues
6. Petition of  Support

With a belief that by working together, Australians can create a model acceptable to the majority of Australians in the majority of States. Feel free to add comments that will contribute to the discussion at the bottom of each respective page.

Now is the time where all Australians can have a say in the way in how Australia  moves to a Republic.

All Australians should take ownership of this important responsibility now!

To step away from this decision now, will allow future generations to create a Republic of their choosing, one in which which the Australians of today will possibly have no say.

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6 Responses to The Republic of Australia

  1. Republican says:

    @ LJ Holden — thanks for the support!

  2. Arden Szeredy says:

    I really like what you wrote. I am happy that I managed to end up here instead of some junky blog. Thank you!

  3. LJ Holden says:

    Hi there Republican – please keep posting! Brilliant website.

  4. Bill Jay says:

    Just a a quick question. Under the current constitution could the queen choose to perform all the functions of the Governor General when she is in Australia? In NZ I think she can carry out all the NZ GG’s duties.

    • Republican says:

      Hi Bill, Thanks for adding the comment and question.
      Answer: I don’t know — and in my quick hunt around the web did not find an answer. However, I suspect that there would be no reason she couldn’t, should she choose to.

  5. Oz Republic says:

    Yes! It is time for Australians to accept the responsibility of the Head of State being an Australian… This is an interesting concept and makes sense

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